It’s time to gear up for the second coming of the Mockit Championship Series, and this time around, we have made a few exciting changes!

 


 

1. New Region

 

After watching how well the Oceania region played in RLCS, it seemed only right to add the uber talented Aussies into the mix. In order to stop a potentially hellish pinged final, the OCE division will be its own tournament, presented entirely by our partner’s at Pale Horse eSports.

 

The teams down under will be competing for a $2,000 USD minimum prize pool.

 


 

2. Prize Pool

 

The North American and European divisions will remain bitter rivals as the EU teams will be looking to rebound after NA took out EU in season one. These juggernauts will be competing for a minimum prize pool of $6,000 USD.

 

Combined, we are proud to announce that season two of MCS will have a total prize pool in excess of $8,000 USD; this will be a tournament to remember!

 


 

3. General Tournament Changes

 

Signups for this long-anticipated tournament will take place over the course of three and a half weeks:

Friday, June 30th – Wednesday, July 26th

 

Teams will be capped at 5 players, and it is encouraged to field a full roster. We have endeavored for MCS Season Two to not be conflicting with any of the major tournaments/LAN’s across all 3 regions!

 

League play will only play out one night a week. This is to ensure MCS does not conflict with any summer plans you may have in store! NA will play Mondays, EU on Wednesdays, and OCE on Thursdays.

 


 

We are very excited to see how many of you Rocket League enthusiasts wish to test your skills and become the very best, like no one ever was. We had over 1,000 players battle it out in Season One, so only time will tell what this iteration will look like. We’re sure everyone, including us, will be excited to see how Season Two will play out!

 

Head on over to smash.gg/mcs2 to sign up, and make sure to check out mockit.gg/rules for a complete set of rules. Our admins, community managers, and moderators can be found at discord.gg/mockit if you have any questions!

League Play Tiebreakers and Playoff Format

For all tiebreakers that may arise in league play, we will refer to head to head matchups in the case that two teams are tied. If this does not resolve the tie or more than two teams are tied then we will use each teams game win percentage as a tiebreaker. If this still results in a tie then the teams tied will playoff in a Best of the 3 Series (This can include more than 2 teams with a format to facilitate these teams).

 

 

The Mcs Playoffs with run the 26-27th of may. Friday the 26th with start at 7BST for the EU side with the NA to follow 30 mins after the conclusion of EU’s day 1. Day 2 on the 27th will start at 5BST and will go on to completion of the playoffs.

 

——————————————————————————————————————–

 

                                  Bo5                         Bo5

– May 26 – (Match 1 , 2 , 3 )  and the (upper final) EU and NA

 

                             Bo5                         Bo7                                                 Bo7                    Bo9

– May 27 – (Lower bracket finals), (grand finals) EU and NA, and world finals (lower) and (upper). 

 

 

1st Place – 40% + RLCS tickets

2nd Place – 25% + RLCS tickets

3rd Place – 15% + RLCS tickets

4th Place – 10%

5th Place – 5%

6th Place – 5%

 

Stev’s Guide on the Mental Aspect of Rocket League

Stev’s Guide on the Mental Aspect of Rocket League

 

**NOTE** This guide is solely from me and my experiences, take from it as you will, and best of luck! (You can message me if you need extra help.)

Hello everyone! For those of you who do not know me by more than a Twitter follow, my name is Stephen “Stev” Edinger and I have spent about a year at the upper end of the competitive North American Rocket League scene. I have previously subbed for Exodus consisting of GarretG, Turtle, Moses and Huskih, as well as myself. I currently play on a team with Sham and Smgschwind. I am 19 and have roughly 2,000 hours played on Rocket League since August of 2015. In this guide you will find a few tips on how to improve your mental skills as a rocket league player. These skills are crucial to becoming a better player, in my opinion, be it from Silver 1 to Gold 1 or Diamond to Champion.

 

Before I talk about the guide, I have a short opinion that I believe is worth reading. Furthermore, getting into the short guide, I will talk about 3 main components. The first of these is Decision Making. Sure, this is pretty obvious to many of you, but deciding when to go for a ball can determine the outcome of a game. Secondly, there is Positioning. Again, a seemingly obvious skill or tip that everyone hears all the time. But what does Positioning mean? I am on the pitch, and I can hit the ball, so I do, right? Finally, there is Practice. Sure, the age-old adage that practice makes perfect does stand true, but what in the world does that even mean? What am I supposed to practice? Does hours played equate to skill? Well, in this guide, I will do my best to cover all of these questions. At the end of the guide I will present the list of tips in a smaller format for quick reference.

 

PART 1: MY THOUGHTS

 

Before I bore you with this philosophical rant, you all probably want to know why I do not get right into the “tips” of this guide, and I promise you I will as soon as I say one thing. Whether you know it or not, you are on the internet. And on the internet, there is a level of anonymity that allows for people to say and do unnecessary things. No matter what rank you are in Rocket League, there will always be people who make fun of you, people who get frustrated and quit, people who down right try to make you feel like crap because it is a form of entertainment for them. I personally want to let you know, that at some point or another, I have been on both ends of these claims. It does not matter how you get to where you are going, it only matters that you survived the journey to get there. What I am trying to say is, at times, teammates are going to yell at you and you will be upset with your teammates. One of you will leave at some point. You see, none of this really matters in the grand scheme of things. In my opinion, Psyonix has set up one of the greatest game formats in videogames. On average, a Rocket League match will last somewhere around 10 minutes, based on queue time plus average game length. In what situation should you let one person ruin your day in 10 minutes? Your ultimate enjoyment of this game, even if you play just for the “banter”, should come from your experience in the game as you develop as a player. Sure, you missed that crucial ball that allowed the other team to get the game winning goal. But you know what? Maybe you just learned how to approach that situation differently the next time. “I should have done this. I should not have gone for that.” These situations will develop you as a player; a database of past experiences that learns from its mistakes. All I want from you, as the reader, is to make mistakes and TRY to learn from them.

 

PART 2: DECISION MAKING

 

So we made it through the deep rant and I hope you are ready to head into the 3-step guide, because I sure am. To start things off, we have Decision Making. So what is Decision Making? Decision Making in Rocket League consists of a few things. Should I challenge the ball? Where are my teammates? When do I shoot? These three questions will be the core focus of my guide and tips on decision making.

To start with Should I challenge the ball?, I’ll give you a little scenario. Disregard the amount of boost you have or need, you are facing towards the ball from your own net. The ball is center field, and you see that a member of the other team is racing towards it, as well as a member from your team. Both of them are equidistant from the ball, but far enough that you might be able to make it there before them. What do you do? For newer players in the game, many of you will have already turned on the afterburners racing towards that ball. Some of the more moderately-skilled players will have moved towards the ball, but show caution because they don’t know where the ball will go after both the enemy player and their teammate smack it. While it is acceptable to do what the more skilled players do, the right thing to do in this situation is to wait for your teammate to make contact, and immediately react to the ball. Sure, you can move around a little bit to better position yourself for the potential hit, but preemptively committing to something that hasn’t even happened yet is a dangerous game to be playing if you are new to the game. More experienced players, due to their experience, will be able to determine what sort of hit their teammates will be able to make based on the skill group they are in. That is, the higher skill level you are, the more you can preemptively commit to a hit because you know your teammate will win the challenge. That being said, when joining competitive matches solo, do not always preemptively commit to a hit unless you know who you are playing with.

Knowing who you are playing with is a good point to transition into my next subject, Where are my teammates? Often at the top end of the Rocket League community, the professional players, you will find an experience of gameplay that is unlike most of the rest of the community. Every ball is a calculated pass or strike in order to set a teammate up or to keep the ball out of the other team’s hands. However, teamwork is something that evolves as you grow as a player, and being able to reliably pass back and forth between your teammates is not something I expect all of you to be able to do. For beginners, take a few seconds in-game to hang back and Read your teammate. Reading your teammate consists of watching them go for the ball, and formulating something in your head on whether they can or can not reliably hit the ball. If they can reliably hit the ball, you can start to preemptively commit, as I covered in the previous section. Now when I say read your teammate, do not sit back in your own net (unless your teammate is approaching the ball on your side of the field) as it does nothing for your team if they are able to complete a pass or center a ball. Watch how your teammate plays, and play around them. How does this work in with knowing where my teammates are? Well, since you now have an idea of what your teammate might be able to do, you can expect to go for certain hits or let them hit the ball. Generally, when playing Rocket League, you never want to be right next to your teammate. If you know your teammate is ready to hit the ball, but you decide to go for the same ball that they do, it creates a disruption in your defense/offense and ultimately gives the other team an opportunity to capitalize on. If you can work with and around your teammate, you will be more successful as a Rocket League player.

Lastly, Decision Making also encompasses the choices of shooting and where to put the ball. When deciding to go for a shot, there are many factors that come into play other than just smacking the ball at the opponent’s goal. Is there anyone in the net? At lower skill levels, generally you can hit a higher shot and score with ease. However, as you progress through the ranking systems, many players will be able to save a ball flying towards them because they have learned how to control their cars more properly. When you are going to shoot, you need to understand what a goalie can save. If you can take a hard shot from close range, please do it, because you will most likely score as long as you do not shoot it right into the opponent. On the flipside, if you are far away, decent players will be able to save the ball regardless of where it comes from. And throwing the ball at your opponent does you no good because you lose possession and ultimately the chance to score. More times than not, it is safer to move the ball to the side of the pitch and work it through the corners and set your team up for a shot, if you are the one advancing the ball. If you are the second or third person back, do not immediately charge the ball if your teammate has lost it in the corner. Many times there will be a scrum in the corner with everyone challenging the ball, and if you overextend yourself, you will be at a disadvantage when the ball pops out. Okay. So we’ve cleared up that needlessly charging the ball in the corner while your teammate is still right next to it is a bad thing. What happens now that your teammate is able to center it for you?

You may exclaim, Shooting, I want to shoot! Yes, it is always a great feeling to put the ball in the back of the net, but do not forget to “Great Pass!” your teammate if they set up that perfect shot for you to score. Here’s another scenario; your teammate hits the ball low into the corner and it bounces up into the center of the opposing team’s box. For you newer players, my advice is to take advantage of Rocket League’s double jump feature. Try and reach the ball at its highest point and hit it with the front of your car in the air. Generally, if you can carry some momentum with your two jumps and hit the ball towards the goal, you have a good chance of scoring. Intermediate players, try your hand at an aerial. Rocket League is so much more than just SocCar. I want you to know that thinking you can not do something because you have not done it before, does not make it impossible. I will cover more tips on how to make the seemingly impossible possible in the practice session of the guide. When shooting, trust yourself, believe in yourself, and make your very best attempt to put that ball in the back of the net. Right now, I do not care if it goes in, or if you even hit the ball at all, and neither should you. The fact that you believed in yourself to attempt something new is a huge accomplishment and unlocks another aspect of your game that you never even knew you had. When I started, I would watch someone flying through the sky with a good amount of control, and I was so in awe of what they could do. I aspired to be them, and I set goals for myself. I tried things out, and eventually, they started to become more natural, reflexes even. I progressed to a point where other players were now looking at me in awe, and all it took was some time and the BELIEF that I could do something cool if I TRIED. When shooting, do not hesitate, trust yourself, and you will have done all you can do.

 

PART 3: POSITIONING

 

Positioning is much more straightforward than decision making, as it can be presented as a whole, rather than to each individual skill level. With that being said, this section will be much shorter than the previous one. When I break down positioning, there are really only two major components: Working with and around your teammates and Putting yourself in the “proper” defensive position. Before I branch off into the two sections, I’ll add that Positioning is ALWAYS relative to the situation that is currently in front of you. For example, if you find yourself up 4-3 with thirty seconds left, you want to keep possession on the opponents’ side of the field without over-extending to give up a cheap goal. However, if you’re down 3-4 with thirty seconds left, you want to go all out and pressure your opponents into making a mistake so you can tie it up before you lose the game. This is how positioning becomes a relative and fluid thing.

So, when trying to Work with and around your teammates, there are a couple things you have to think about. Do I use ball cam or not? Right now I will tell you that either playing strictly with or strictly without ball-cam is not preferred. A good balance is useful to manage your boost when the ball is in the opponent’s zone and you’re driving away, so you turn ball-cam off for a quick second to line up that full boost pad, for example. Almost always when I am playing the ball, I have ball-cam on, because your car moves in relation to the ball when ball-cam is on, not freely like when the camera is toggled off. For controllers, I can not give you any tips on keybinds or whether toggle or hold is better for ball-cam, because I play with a keyboard and mouse. However, my settings for keyboard are default and ball-cam is toggled, not held, if you were wondering. Now how does this all filter in with my teammates?, you may be asking. When you have ball-cam on, it can be hard to know where your teammates are. Likewise, it can be hard for your teammates to know where you are, unless you both communicate. I advocate for you to communicate as much as possible, so you should familiarize yourself with the improved system that Psyonix has given since the Season 3 Patch. Using quick chats like “Need Boost!” or “Defending” can let your teammates know what type of situation you are in without much effort.

The next thing to consider is Who should go for the ball? There are multiple factors that determine who should go for the ball, as covered in Decision Making, but when it comes to working with and around your teammates, it boils down to Communication. In Rocket League, communication is everything. A major factor is which one of you has boost. If (both of) your teammate(s) just recovered to the net after going for an aerial and you have boost, its logical for you to be the one to go for the next ball. This is a two-way street, however, and you should make sure that your teammates know that you have the ability to hit the ball, because if you don’t, you need to let them know so they can continue pressuring or continue the rotation. Rotational play is something that will come as you learn to work with and around your teammates, and if you watch professional Rocket League, you will see that the team with better rotations and less holes in their rotation will come out on top.

The last thing I want to cover with Positioning is indeed, Rotational Play. The concept is simple, but can take a while to master, which is my favorite way of explaining Rocket League. When thinking about Rotational Play, you have to be aware of where your teammates are and know how to work with and around your teammates. Since 2v2 is the most preferred format of ranked play and probably the most unforgiving of rotational mistakes, I’ll use a 2v2 scenario to help you understand Rotational Play and how it involves Positioning. Your random teammate is moving the ball into their corner, you have full boost, and you’re behind your teammate. Scenario 1: You follow your teammate into the corner and take his ball and put it into the center of the field. Scenario 2: You wait at midfield to see if your teammate beats the first defender and gives you an opportunity to score. Scenario 3: You wait in your net with full boost waiting for the ball to come down to your end so you can make a play on it, because having two players from the same team on the offensive end is bad. Answer: Honestly, for a while, I played with my friends early on and thought that ever having two players pushed too far up was just asking for trouble. However, the correct solution to positioning is indeed Scenario 2. When you are at midfield, you have the ability to: capitalize on a successful pass, move to either the left side or right side of the field to pick up an errant/blocked pass, and ultimately retain control of the ball. If the ball is pinched over your head, make sure it is not going into the goal first, and then recover to the goal so you can play outward from there.

Now let’s flip the scenario, as the final thing I cover in the Positioning section of my guide. Again, the same scenario, except this time you are the one moving the ball through the corner. Assume, for the sake of the scenario, that your teammate is properly placed somewhere at midfield, awaiting your pass. Scenario 1: You move the ball into the corner and you are met by a brick-wall of a defender. The defender stuffs you and puts the ball a little bit behind you. Answer: Here, you should be moving out and back towards your net while collecting boost along the way, the defender obviously won possession of the ball, so recover and become the “help” for your teammate if they fail to re secure the ball. Scenario 2: You successfully pass the ball around the first defender and set your teammate up for a shot. What now? Answer: You again, rotate out. But this time, it’s to midfield where you collect boost and reposition yourself because your teammate may have missed but you can recollect yourself and score. This is where ball-cam becomes useful as you toggle between searching for boost and being focused on the ball. Scenario 3: You repeat Scenario 2, but this time, your teammate scores. You tell them “Nice shot!”, and your teammate says, “Great pass!” and you move on to the next kickoff. That’s it for Positioning, but, if there is one thing that I will leave  you with when discussing the topic, it is to be patient.

 

PART 4: PRACTICE

 

Practice makes perfect. We have all heard it, and it sure rings true in Rocket League. Yes, I want to keep this section short, for the sake of your interest, but I can’t just tell you to go get out there and play (even though that is a really good way to learn how to read and communicate with teammates). Ever since I started playing Rocket League, the game has come at me in bits and pieces. From watching someone aerial, to learning how to aerial, to going out and translating practice into play (mind you, very poorly at first), there are steps to practicing that will help you develop you into the player you want to be. I’ll list the steps here, but I won’t go into much detail because there’s so many things that anyone could want to learn, that telling you how to get better at any specific skill would require me to be a master of them all (which by no stretch I am), and isn’t the reason for this guide.

Step 1: Find out what you want to get better at. We’ve all wanted to do something in Rocket League, but we just couldn’t wrap our heads around how that was possible. For me, seeing is believing. I’ve watched people do things that at one point, I didn’t even know was possible. However, I thought to myself, “If they can do that, why can’t I?” Singling out what you want to get better at can elevate your game, especially if you find yourself to be struggling overall.

Step 2: Make use of Free Play and Training Modes. After you figure out what you need to work on, take it to the free play and training modes. Psyonix already has built-in options for these to help you practice on your abilities. For example, if I never knew how to aerial outside of jumping, pointing my car up and holding down boost, I would go into the Rookie Aerial Training and keep attempting it until I felt comfortable with the mechanics of an aerial. Generally speaking, before going up in training difficulty level, I would consistently earn a score of 80% or higher on my current level. Yes, sitting in a lobby without other players can be boring, but you can also queue up for games while doing training. “How does using the training modes and free play translate into actual gameplay experience?” is something you may ask.

Step 3: Go try out your newly acquired skill in an unranked setting. Naturally, the expectations for ranked play are higher than an unranked setting, and taking advantage of the unranked setting is a key factor in developing as a player. There are no penalties for giving up a stupid goal, and as I previously covered, you now should be able to shrug that off without feeling bad. Playing by yourself in an unranked game is “you-time”. Sure, ultimately you want to have your team’s score higher than the others, but unranked is a great place for personal development. The biggest thing you can do wrong in an unranked match is be afraid of making mistakes. If you don’t get outside of your normal playstyle, how can you expect to get better? If you go into a match with the mindset of someone trying to improve, I assure that you will get better.

 

PART 5: CLOSING THOUGHTS

 

Finally, I will say that time played does equate to skill level. This is true if and only if the player with a certain number of hours has played the game with the mindset of getting better. For example, I’ve played League of Legends for the past 3 years and I’m still stuck in silver. However, I don’t take that game as seriously as Rocket League, and there’s a correlation with what you put in and what you get out. Practicing and making mistakes will get frustrating at times, which is perfectly fine. Taking a break is okay, too. I didn’t expect to get better overnight, and neither should you. I thank you all for reading my guide and I hope you believe in the me that believes in you. I know you all can get better, all you have to do is try.

Caster’s Corner Episode 1

As week 2 of MCS draws ever closer we begin to contemplate the possibilities of who will make league play and even win the title of MCS Champion Season 1.

The talent level in the MCS is undeniable and it goes to show how good this scene is becoming. With
NA teams like
Iris  (Lachinio,Squishy,Torment)
Ohana  – (HotwheelsSid,Moses,Dudewiththenose)
And EU teams
Urban Myths – (Doomsee,Sedadam,Bluey)
RedEye – (Dadooh,Tequilaz,X3MW)

its easy to see that this tourney will be unbelievable.

After week 2 we will narrow the field down to 16 teams, 8 in each division. This will give us 4 weeks of exciting league play where the combatants will duel it out 4 nights a week to stake their claim at the over $5000 prize.
Its not an easy road, but it is a rewarding one to the team that can maintain the mental fortitude needed to obtain the ultimate prize. Season 1 MCS Champion. Who will it be? My favorites have to be the teams already mentioned but favorites do lose as seen in the recent RLCS tournament. Other notable teams would have to be NA : Nova, Freestylers in Disguise, Heroes of Tomorrow, Eggplant , LIFE , Toxicity and Spectrum. While EU boasts teams like Rex Gaming , Copenhagen Flames, Retry, Planetkey Dynamics , OneTrickPony and eff0rt. All and all this sets up to be a memorable event for players and fans. Having this streamed in four languages will definitely add to the excitement. Lets see what the next few months has in store for us.

MCS Week 2 Information

We would like to extend a MASSIVE thank you to the over 1,000 Entrants into the first of our quarterly MCS tournaments. The reception from the community was nothing less than AMAZING.

Additionally, we would like to extend a special thank you to the teams who qualified for week 2. The teams are as follows:

Next weeks brackets can be found here:
Americas brackets Click Here
EU Brackets Click Here

Variance from RLCS:
We thought it was a better idea to reset the entire bracket for week 2. In RLCS, the losers bracket is maintained. However, we had many comments on seeding. To make sure the seeding is 100% fair, our week 2 will be a full bracket reset.

Times:
Times are are on the smash brackets. Refer there for local times.

Streams:
Official Streams will start on Tuesday, April 4th.
Streamed Matches:
On the brackets they are notated as: Winners Quarter-Final and Losers Round 4.
Essentially, the matches that punch a team’s ticket to league play will be streamed.  The brackets will be paused and the members of the teams competing will be given lobby details. Teams who are in these matches MUST BE on the Mockit Discord to receive their streaming instructions. If a match starts before a stream is ready, the match will be restarted wholly, no exceptions. Being in the discord simply allows us to disseminate information quicker. You do not need to be in voice chat.

Official Stream Channels
English –  twitch.tv/mockitleague
French – hosted by Metaleak – twitch.tv/conceptops
Dutch – hosted by TradeCentral – twitch.tv/tradecentral
Spanish – twitch.tv/mockit_ESP

MCS Update & FAQ

Signups have officially closed. We are happy to announce we have had over 1,000 individuals sign up for our new tournament series.
TL;DR : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC7LY3cdI18


Bracket Times Update
NA/SA Brackets – https://goo.gl/yF77Ic
March 27th
Winners Round 1 – 8:00pm EDT – 9:00pm EDT
Winners Round 2/Losers Round 1 – 9:00pm EDT – 10:00pm EDT
March 28th
Winners Round 3/Losers Round 2 – 8:00pm EDT – 9:00pm EDT
Winners Round 4/Losers Round 3 – 9:00pm EDT – 10:00pm EDT
March 29th
Losers Round 4 – 8:00pm Eastern – 9:00pm EDT
Losers Round 5 – 9:00pm Eastern – 10:00pm EDT

*Brackets will advance as quickly as both teams are avaible to advance. The tournament may progress quicker than 3 days. (Is anticipated to do so)

EU Brackets – https://goo.gl/dBJRox
March 27th
Winners Round 1 – 7:00pm BST- 8:00pm BST
Winners Round 2/Losers Round 1 – 8:00pm BST- 9:00pm BST
March 28th
Winners Round 3/Losers Round 2 – 7:00pm BST- 8:00pm BST
Losers Round 3 – 8:00pm BST- 9:00pm BST
March 29th
Losers Round 4 – 7:00pm BST- 8:00pm BST

Prize Pool Distribution (Per Team) 
1st Prize – 40% – RLCS Live Final Tickets
2nd Prize – 25% – RLCS Live Final Tickets
3rd Prize – 15% – RLCS Live Final Tickets
4th Prize – 10%
5th Prize – 5%
6th Prize – 5%
*Disclaimer: All Donations given during MCS streams will go directly to the prize pool. Total prize is expected to be more than $5,000

RLCS Ticket Clarification
Some Prizes include RLCS live final tickets for only the three starters on the roster. No flights nor hotel rooms nor food will be comp’d. Tickets will be issued via email after the MCS online finals.

During the tournament, what if I need help?
Using the smash.gg in bracket “message moderator” buttons are the quickest option. Our Moderation staff will be on during all live brackets. Additionally, using our discord is another option.

Mockit Championship Series Time Updates

The MCS signups are now available on smash.gg/mcs. We decided to push the actual start on Monday back 1.5 hours to allow for more schedules to line up.
Questions? Come to our discord and ask one of our mods or community managers.
Discord.gg/mockit – Alternatively you can just hit the “+” to add a server in your discord client and type mockit.
Signups Close – 11:59PM Eastern Saturday March 25th
Brackets Start – 7:30PM Eastern Monday March 27thConsoles? – PC/PS4 Only
More DetailsCheck out our new website for more info
EVEN MORE! – Camping Rusher made a great video explaining things in detail! Click Here To See It

Play Times For Brackets NA/SA
Round 1 – 7:30pm Eastern – 8:30pm Eastern March 27th
Round 2 – 8:30pm Eastern – 9:30pm Eastern March 27th
Round 3 – 9:30pm Eastern – 10:30pm Eastern March 27th
——-END OF DAY——-
Round 4 – 7:30pm Eastern – 8:30pm Eastern March 28th
Round 5 – 8:30pm Eastern – 9:30pm Eastern March 28th
Round 6 – 9:30pm Eastern – 10:30pm Eastern March 28th
——-END OF DAY——-
Continuing on in similar fashion until there are 32 teams

Play Times For Brackets EU
Round 1 – 7:30pm GMT – 8:30pm GMT March 27th
Round 2 – 8:30pm GMT – 9:30pm GMT March 27th
Round 3 – 9:30pm GMT – 10:30pm GMT March 27th
——-END OF DAY——-
Round 4 – 7:30pm GMT – 8:30pm GMT March 28th
Round 5 – 8:30pm GMT – 9:30pm GMT March 28th
Round 6 – 9:30pm GMT – 10:30pm GMT March 28th
——-END OF DAY——-
Continuing on in similar fashion until there are 32 teams

The Mockit Championship Series Outline

Clarifications
+ If you are a sub for a team that qualified for RLCS League Play you are NOT eligible for this tournament
+ NA and SA brackets will be combined. All matches should be played on NA servers unless both teams are SA. (We will seed the bracket so SA players are likely to play more SA)

Key Dates
+ Signups Begin Wednesday, March 22nd Here https://smash.gg/mcs
+ Signups will Close March 26th
+ Qualifiers begin March 27th in the following time zones and will last one week.
     – NA & SA Brackets -> 6pm EDT (UTC-4:00)
     – EU Bracket -> 6pm GMT (UTC-0:00)
+ Streams begin Week 2 (April 3rd)
     – Streams will be Monday – Friday (6pm – 10pm) EDT and GMT

+ We will have a charity event April 15th. Pros will compete (opt in) during our stream in a king of the hill event. Raising money for http://unsung.org and giving away a white hat

Rules
+ We will only have 1 week of qualifiers. After the tournament starts officially on smash.gg, play the matches until you are qualified.
+ Qualifiers Start on the 27th as outlined above and will end on the 1st
+ Qualifiers will be run from 6pm – 11pm only (Eastern and GMT)(To accommodate for school schedules etc.)
+ 8 teams from NA/SA and 8 teams from EU will be taken to MCS League Play
+ League Play will be a round robin format with a playoff for top 4 for seeding purposes
+ Finals will be held online in a double elimination bracket. Servers will be hunted for meaning the Mockit Staff will find mutually agreeable servers before matches begin. Additionally, servers will be rotated between NA/SA and EU for optimized fairness
+ All league play matches will be streamed. Contestants must be in the Mockit Discord to streamline communication prior to each stream. Players DO NOT need to be in the discord while playing their matches.
+ For additional rules regarding SOP please refer to mockit.gg/rules
+ All Matches in league play will be streamed on these channels
   – English   -> http://twitch.tv/mockitleague

   – French    -> http://twitch.tv/conceptops
   – Spanish  -> http://twitch.tv/mockit_ESP
   – Dutch      -> http://twitch.tv/tradecentral


FOR MORE RULES PLEASE SEE:
http://mockit.gg/2017/03/15/mockit-championship-series-announced/

DISCLAIMER: MCS is not affiliated with RLCS, NGE, Twitch Inc., or Psyonix, Inc

MCSLogo

Mockit Championship Series Announced

As League Play commences for the fabled RLCS, the community finds itself in a very awkward position. This RLCS qualifying season was a strange one; more upsets than anyone could have ever imagined. To that end, many heart broken and demoralized fans watched their favorite teams start to disband. We at Mockit think this is highly detrimental to the future stability of the Rocket League scene, so we are starting the MCS!

Here are the tentative details. More details and full outline will be available soon.

Rules
+ Rules will be formally announced soon, but you can use the RLCS official rules as a template to what the MCS rules will look like.
+ If you are registered on a team that made League Play for RLCS you CANNOT enter the MCS!

Eligibility
+ South America
+ North America
+ Europe
+ Must be 15 years of age of older

Streams
+ Streams will be cast in a variety of languages all at the same time on different twitch channels. This is so viewers who have a preference of language can watch in a more relaxed fashion.
   Tentative Languages
   + Spanish
   + French
   + Dutch
   + English
If you would like to apply to be a caster for the MCS, please email tray@mockit.gg

Prize
+ The initial prize is set at $5,000, however, all donations received during MCS official streams will go directly to the prize pool. That’s right. ALL DONATIONS!. So the final prize will be much more than $5,000 done through Matcherino
+ RLCS Live Final Tickets (conditions apply)

Times
+ We will be streaming on multiple channels in multiple languages.
+ Tentative schedule is Monday Tuesday Thursday Friday 7:00pm  – 10:00PM Eastern and BST times

Format
+ 2 weeks of qualifiers followed by 4 weeks of league play (Similar to that of RLCS)
+ There will be Separate SA, NA, and EU League Play.
+ Finals will be decided via a fair online way TBD. May 27th and 28th

Enough talking, when can we sign up?
+ Sign ups will be announced at the beginning of next week.


*Disclaimer: The Mockit Championship Series is not affiliated with Twitch Interactive, Inc. or Psyonix, Inc. in anyway shape, form or fashion.

 

Mockit eSports RLCS Sweepstakes

Hello Mockit Headz,

It has been a while since our last update, but we promise you the wait has been worth it. Today we would like to announce something very special to our fans. We are doing a huge Sweepstakes.

Want to go to Rocket League Championship Series LAN but don’t know how? Well, the answer is right here!

You have the chance to WIN a free trip to the RLCS LAN! 

It has been an amazing 2016 so far in Rocket League and especially for us here at Mockit eSports. We love our fans and we want to send you to HOLLYWOOD! Here is how to enter.

Step 1:
Make a youtube video titled “I am the biggest Mockit eSports Fan”

Step 2:
In the video explain why you are the most die hard of all Mockit eSports fans and why you in particular deserve to go above all others.

Step 3:
Post the video by July 21st at 11:59 PM EST to twitter by tagging @mockitleague and @realLuckey with the hashtag #BiggestMockitFan and we will pick a winner two weeks before the RLCS LAN!

Video Requirements

  • At least 60 seconds in length
  • No longer than 5 minutes in length
  • You must speak to the camera directly (no voice overs, we want to see you!)
  • Bonus points for: Extreme Creativity

Be as creative and wacky as possible. The video we feel exemplifies the culture we have at Mockit eSports will win! 

What do I get if I win?

  • Roundtrip airfare to the event
  • Two nights hotel stay
  • An exclusive meet and greet with the Mockit eSports Pro Teams
  • $200 per diem for meals
  • Mockit eSports Pro Team Jersey
  • (1) General admission ticket to the event

Stipulations:

  • You must be 18 years of age by July 25th 2016
  • You must be a legal US resident
  • You must live within the contiguous 48 states
  • You must sign a release of liability waiver before flight booking

Good luck and may the odds be ever in your favor.

The Mockit Team

P.S. We are happy to take submission for people who do not meet the required stipulations. We will do a secondary prize for non-residents and underage folks with a really cool discord role and a Mockit eSports special edition jersey with their gamer tag on it!

This sweepstakes is not endorsed by or affiliated with Twitch Interactive, Inc., Psyonix, or the Rocket League Championship Series.